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Ohio governor weighs in on 'horrible tragedy' of alleged overprescription deaths at hospital

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BY LU ANN STOIA, WSYX/WTTE

COLUMBUS, Ohio (CIRCA via WSYX/WTTE) — About 400 nurses convened at the Ohio Statehouse to bring light to policy issues impacting the healthcare profession.

Workplace violence is one of those on the list for Ohio’s 350,000 nurses. According to the Ohio Nurses Association, one in four nurses are assaulted at work. The association is asking lawmakers for better reporting requirements in Ohio to track the attacks.

Attorneys release 4 names of patients who died under care of doctor who no longer works at Ohio hospital

While it was not part of the formal program, nurses were talking about the investigation into the alleged deaths of 35 patients under the care of Dr. William Husel at Mount Carmel Hospitals.

Ohio Nurses Association CEO Kelly Trautner said nurses must have a seat at the table in determining safety protocol and what sort of standards are in place for patient care delivery. “It is going to be a critical loss if we end up losing Mount Carmel from our community.”

Gov. Mike DeWine said Ohio needs to look at inspecting hospitals and better regulating them in light of the allegations being revealed in the Mount Carmel investigation.

Hospital says Ohio doctor may have killed 27 patients by overprescribing painkillers

“We have to look at this horrible tragedy, and we have to learn from that so that is going to be something that the legislature is certainly going to look at, something we are going to look at, I don’t have anything more specific today,” he said

Reports of the wrongful death lawsuits brought by families who say their loved ones got lethal doses of pain medication are swirling around the medical community. Questions about why nurses didn’t report the alleged wrongdoing are being asked.

Nurse Carol Sams said they have a code of ethics. “If there is something we really feel strongly about we can say know and have support from administration and other nurses in the area. We do have whistleblower protection in the State of Ohio so it is important for us to utilize that and to really identify our best conscience and how we take care of our patients.”

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