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Oscar Nominations - Actress
This image released by Warner Bros. shows Lady Gaga in a scene from the latest reboot of the film, "A Star is Born." On Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019, Lady Gaga was nominated for an Oscar for best actress for her role in the film. The 91st Academy Awards will be held on Feb. 24. (Clay Enos/Warner Bros. via AP)

Gaga, Kendrick Lamar, SZA, Diane Warren top Oscar music nods

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Updated January 22, 2019 12:35 PM EST

By MESFIN FEKADU, AP Music Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Lady Gaga is a double nominee at the Academy Awards, where rapper Kendrick Lamar is nominated for the first time while songwriter Diane Warren is also vying for her first win with her 10th nomination.

Gaga scored best actress and best original song nominations Tuesday for her work in "A Star Is Born" — repeating the success Mary J. Blige achieved last year when she became the first person to compete for both acting and songwriting awards in the same year.

Gaga's "Shallow" was co-written with Anthony Rossomando, Andrew Wyatt and Mark Ronson, the producer behind hits for Amy Winehouse, Bruno Mars and more.

"I mean it's so incredible," Ronson said quietly Tuesday as he was boarding a flight. "It's insane and it's so wonderful."

Lamar's nomination for "All the Stars" from "Black Panther" puts him in a group of elite rappers to be nominated for an Oscar; Eminem, Common and Three 6 Mafia are all winners of best original song. The prestigious nomination comes a year after his "Damn" album won the Pulitzer Prize for music, making him the first non-classical or jazz artist to win the prize.

The nomination is also a major milestone for R&B singer SZA, who was the most nominated woman at last year's Grammys but walked away empty-handed. The Top 10 hit "All the Stars," which also earned co-writers Mark Spears and Anthony Tiffith nominations, is up for four Grammys at the Feb. 10 show and could finally win the singer an award.

Other original song nominees include "The Place Where Lost Things Go" from "Mary Poppins," written by Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman; "When a Cowboy Trades His Spurs for Wings" from "The Ballad of Buster Scruggs," written by David Rawlings and Gillian Welch; and "I'll Fight" from the Ruth Bader Ginsburg documentary "RBG," written by Warren.

Warren joked about being up for her tenth Oscar without ever winning.

"I'm now in the double digits," Warren said, laughing.

"I'm not jaded at all," she continued. "I need some coffee though because I'm sleep deprived. I was anxious so I was up and my friends came over and we basically had an all-night party waiting for the nominations."

"I'll Fight" from "RBG" — which also earned a nomination for best documentary feature — is performed by Oscar-winner Jennifer Hudson.

"I wanted to write a powerful song that captures what ... Ruth Bader Ginsburg does and what she's always done, which is fight. And she's still fighting and I'm sending good wishes out to her right now for a speedy recovery," Warren said of the U.S. Supreme Court justice, who recently underwent surgery to remove cancer nodules from a lung.

"Shallow" is the frontrunner and has won a number of original song honors so far, from the Golden Globes to Critics Choice Awards.

The song has become a radio hit, peaking at No. 5 on Billboard's Hot 100 chart and scoring four Grammy nominations. The soundtrack, featuring songs co-written by Bradley Cooper as well as Gaga, is platinum and debuted at No. 1 on the charts.

"(Gaga) painstakingly paid that much attention to making sure the songs were good and so did Bradley," Ronson said. "Bradley is such a giant music fan. I've seen him walking around Glastonbury Festival in England at 4 in the morning on a Sunday, like catching the last band. I think it was so important for him to get the music right on this."

Ronson and Gaga collaborated on her 2016 album "Joanne," a rock-pop-country adventure that was a departure from the dance-flavored electronic sound that made her a multiplatinum juggernaut. Ronson said their closeness helped make "Shallow" great.

"We had this personally rapport and we got close (and) that is probably why we were able to go somewhere a little bit — pardon the pun — deeper on 'Shallow.' I think if we just had met that day and it was like a songwriting session like, 'OK we got to write a song for this movie today' — it would probably be a bit of a different deal," he said. "But we'd gone through a pretty personal place, a really personal place on 'Joanne,' maybe her most personal record, so I feel like there was this ease when we started and did 'Shallow.'"

Nominees for best original score include Childish Gambino's longtime producer Ludwig Goransson, who scored "Black Panther"; Alexandre Desplat for "Isle of Dogs"; Shaiman for "Mary Poppins Returns"; Nicholas Britell for "If Beale Street Could Talk; and Terence Blanchard for "BlacKkKlansman."

Justin Hurwitz, a two-time Oscar winner, was surprisingly shut out. His score for "First Man" won his best original score at the Golden Globes, Critics' Choice Awards and the Satellite Awards.

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By JAKE COYLE, AP Film Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — The Oscars still don't have a host, but on Tuesday morning, they'll at least have nominees.

The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences will unveil nominations to the 91st Oscars on Tuesday morning at 8:20 a.m. EST from the Samuel Goldwyn Theatre in Beverly Hills, California. The nominations, to be announced by Kumail Nanjiani and Tracee Ellis Ross, will be livestreamed globally at Oscars.com , Oscars.org and on the academy's digital platforms like Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

The lead-up to Tuesday's nominations has been rocky for both the film academy and some of the movies in contention. Shortly after being announced as host, Kevin Hart was forced to withdraw over years-old homophobic tweets that the comedian eventually apologized for. That has left the Oscars, one month before its Feb. 24th ceremony, without an emcee, and likely to stay that way.

The season's steadiest contender — Bradley Cooper's "A Star Is Born" — looked potentially unbeatable until it got beat. Despite an enviable string of awards and more than $400 million in worldwide box office, Cooper's lauded remake was almost totally ignored at the Golden Globes, winning just best song and losing best picture, drama, to the popular but critically derided "Bohemian Rhapsody," a movie that jettisoned its director (Bryan Singer) mid-production.

Still, "A Star Is Born" (the sole film to land top nominations from every guild award except the Visual Effects Society) may be the lead nomination-getter Tuesday with around 10 nominations including best actress for Lady Gaga and both best director and best actor for Cooper. But other films, including Ryan Coogler's "Black Panther," Alfonso Cuaron's "Roma" and Yorgos Lanthimos' "The Favourite," could be in for big mornings, too.

Here are some of the pressing questions heading into Tuesday's nominations.

HOW MANY WILL THERE BE?

Best picture nominees can fall anywhere from five to ten. Most commonly, we end up with nine nominees, as there was last year when Guillermo del Toro's "The Shape of Water" ultimately prevailed. Most assured of a spot are the films that have fared well consistently with Hollywood's guilds, whose memberships overlap with the 17 branches of the academy.

The five films picked by the strongly predictive Directors Guild — "BlacKkKlansman," ''A Star is Born," ''Roma," ''Green Book" and "Vice" — are probably in. So, too, are "The Favourite" and "Black Panther," leaving films like "Eighth Grade," ''First Man," ''A Quiet Place" and "Bohemian Rhapsody" vying for a place.

CAN NETFLIX MAKE HISTORY?

"Roma," Cuaron's black-and-white memory masterwork, is poised to hand Netflix its first best picture nomination — something the streaming service has dearly sought. Amazon got there first in 2017 with "Manchester by the Sea" but Netflix came close last year with Dee Rees' "Mudbound." This time around, it has gone against its regular policies to release "Roma" in select theaters shortly in advance of arriving on Netflix.

But there's resistance among some academy members to Netflix films at the Oscars since the company typically bypasses movie theaters. Steve Spielberg has said Netflix films are more like TV movies and deserve an Emmy, not an Oscar.

If "Roma," which is Mexico's foreign language submission, were to win best picture, it would become the first foreign language film to ever win in the category. Cuaron, who served as his own director of photography, is expected to be nominated for both best directing and best cinematography. If he were to win best director, he and his "Three Amigos" countrymen — del Toro, Alejandro G. Inarritu — will have won the category five of the last six years.

WILL 'BLACK PANTHER' ROAR?

Coogler's superhero sensation sold more tickets ($700 million worth) than any other film in North America in 2018. It has thus far won some honors here and there, but "Black Panther" may emerge as a major contender Tuesday. Coogler's film could be well represented in the craft categories, including visual effects, production design and costumes, along with Kendrick Lamar's "All the Stars" in the best song category.

The film's director of photography, Rachel Morrison, last year became the first woman to be nominated for best cinematography. This year, she could repeat the feat.
"Black Panther" could make history in one other way, too. A best picture nomination would be Marvel's first.

WILL SPIKE LAND HIS FIRST DIRECTING NOMINATION?

Spike Lee has been nominated twice before, for writing 1989's "Do the Right Thing" and for best documentary (1998's "4 Little Girls"). The 61-year-old filmmaker has even been given an honorary Oscar by the film academy, in 2015. But this year, Lee is favored to earn his first directing nomination for his impassioned white supremacist drama "BlacKkKlansman."

A year after Greta Gerwig became just the fifth woman nominated for best director, all of this year's favorites are men. Whether someone like Debra Granik ("Leave No Trace") can crack the category this year or not, it will be a different academy voting. In the last few years, the academy has considerably increased its membership in an effort to diversify its ranks, which have historically been overwhelmingly white and male. In June, the academy invited a record 928 new members.

AND ABOUT THAT HOST?

The Academy of Motion Pictures is reportedly planning to go host-less following Hart's exit, something it has tried only once before in an infamous 1989 telecast that featured a lengthy musical number with Rob Lowe and Snow White.

The Oscars last year hit a new ratings low, declining 20 percent and averaging 26.5 million viewers. Though ratings for award shows have generally been dropping, the downturn prompted the academy to revamp this year's telecast. Though initial plans for a new popular film category were scuttled, the academy is planning to present some awards off-air and keep the broadcast to three hours.

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