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Matt Rosendale, Donald Trump

Big money and Trump rallies: The US Senate race in Montana could go either way

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WASHINGTON (CIRCA) - President Donald Trump won Montana in 2016 by 20 points but for the midterm election, he put in some major work in the state, as the U.S. Senate race could go either way.

Montana's state auditor and Republican Senate candidate Matt Rosendale is running against two-time incumbent Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont.

Tester was just about 3 points ahead of Rosendale in a poll released by the Montana Television Network and Montana State University two weeks before the election.

Trump visited the state for the fourth time Saturday to support Rosendale.

"We must have health care that we can actually afford. And I will make sure to always protect those with pre-existing conditions."
Matt Rosendale

And if Trump's visits aren't a sign of how close the race is, the money certainly points to it.

Montana's U.S. Senate race has spent $60 million so far, breaking a state record, The Associated Press reported.

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Both Tester's and Rosendale's campaigns have focused on two major issues for Montana voters: health care and access to public land.

To stop rising health insurance rates, each candidate has very different ideas. Tester wants to fix current laws, while Rosendale wants to repeal them.

"Public lands are critically important to this country and it's critically important to our economy."
Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont.

"We must have health care that we can actually afford. And I will make sure to always protect those with pre-existing conditions," Rosendale said during one of the president's rallies in Missoula, Montana, on Oct. 18.

But when it comes to public lands, both say they oppose the transfer of ownership from federal to state.

"Public lands are critically important to this country and it's critically important to our economy -- $7 billion, 74,000 jobs. You have to have somebody who just doesn't say they are for them, but somebody who is going to fight to keep them in public hands," Tester said.

Earlier this year, Tester was the target of one of Trump's tweets, which called for the senator to resign.

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"I wouldn't be in the United States Senate if I was going to let somebody intimidate me. It doesn't happen," Tester said.

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