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IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR DISCOVERY COMMUNIATIONS - Nik Wallenda walks across the Chicago skyline blindfolded for Discovery Channel's Skyscraper Live with Nik Wallenda on Sunday, Nov. 2, 2014. (Jean-Marc Giboux/AP Images for Discovery Communications)

High wire daredevil Nik Wallenda is challenging death again

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Death-defying acts are nothing new to Nik Wallenda. So it comes to no surprise that the 10-time Guinness World record holder is at it again. This time, his taking his talents to the National Harbor in Maryland.

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IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR DISCOVERY COMMUNICATIONS - Nik Wallenda walks over the Chicago River uphill nearly 8 stories for Discovery Channel's Skyscraper Live with Nik Wallenda on Sunday, Nov. 2, 2014. (Jean-Marc Giboux/AP Images for Discovery Communications)

The king of the high wire will only use the balance bar as he walks from one building to another, covering a distance of 230 feet, all while dangling 75 feet in the air.

These kinds of acts are nothing new to Wallenda or his family.

Nik Wallenda is the seventh generation of the Great Wallendas, whose great grandfather, the legendary Karl Wallenda, brought the family to America for the greatest show on Earth. Nik Wallenda has been learning to walk the high wire since the age of 2.

Nik Wallenda
FILE - In this Nov. 2, 2014 file photo, Nik Wallenda walks on a tightrope uphill at a 19-degree angle from the Marina City west tower across the Chicago River to the top of the Leo Burnett Building in Chicago. Wallenda wants to recreate this summer the walk his great-grandfather Karl completed in 1970 across a 1,000 ft cable 750 feet above Tallulah Falls in Georgia. Wallenda wants to use old film footage of his great-grandfather’s walk to project his image onto the wire, so that both men appear to be walking it side-by-side. Wallenda said in an interview that it’s always been his dream to walk with his great-grandfather. He believes technology can be used to create the effect of both men walking the wire together. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty, File)

The stunt is supposed to be a warm up to his latest show, the Big Apple Circus. Those performances run through March.

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