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Oklahoma City experiences rare lake effect snow

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Snow happening in February is not uncommon.

Lake effect snow is not uncommon either--unless that lake effect snow happened to fall in Oklahoma City.

We've clearly reach that point in winter were the weather no longer makes sense.

The weather event known as lake effect snow that’s extremely commonplace in the upper Midwest and northeastern U.S., made a rare appearance at Oklahoma City’s Lake Hefner.

Meteorologist Ryan Barnes with the National Weather Service said an area south of the lake in western Oklahoma City received lake effect snow about 9:30 p.m. Wednesday.

“Very rare,” Barnes said. “It’s very unusual ... it definitely was snow.”

The weather event can produce heavy snow in the Great Lakes, but Barnes said it resulted in only a dusting, “less than an inch for sure,” in Oklahoma City.

Lake effect snow happens when cold air moves over the warmer, moist air of a body of water.

Conditions that determine whether an area will get lake effect snow include wind direction, orientation of the lake and temperatures both above the storm and at ground level.

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“It can occur where there’s any body of water that’s warm enough, but the conditions have to be nearly perfect and those conditions are not commonly seen outside the Great Lakes," said Barnes.

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