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Alabama Senate: Looking back at some of the most controversial moments of the hard fought race

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Anyone who thought they'd heard the phrase "controversial campaign" for the last time after the 2016 presidential election clearly underestimated the Alabama Senate race.

On Tuesday, voters in Alabama had to choose between Democrat Doug Jones, a former prosecutor, and Roy Moore, the former state Supreme Court chief justice accused of child molestation and sexual misconduct.

Here were some of the most controversial campaign moments of the Alabama Senate race:

1. Multiple women came forward accusing Roy Moore of pursuing or molesting them when they were teenagers and he was in his thirties.

Mitch McConnell publicly disavowed Moore. The house majority leader along with Cory Gardner, the head of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, called on Moore to step aside and threatened to remove him from senate if her were elected.

President Trump, who backed Luther Stranger in the republican primary, had initially avoided throwing his support behind Moore.

However things changed over Thanksgiving when he told reporters, “Let me just tell you, Roy Moore denies it. That’s all I can say. He denies it. And, by the way, he totally denies it. He says it didn’t happen. And, you know, you have to listen to him also. You’re talking about, he said 40 years ago this did not happen.”

According to a report by Politico Trump’s decision to back Moore was the catalyst for the RNC’s decision to begin funding Moore’s campaign again in the week leading up to the election.

Democratic candidate Doug Jones did his part to keep the allegations against Moore in the minds of voters.

"I damn sure believe that I have done my part to ensure that men who hurt little girls should go to jail, and not the United States Senate."

2. During the campaign Moore made comments that were anti-LGBTQ, anti-Muslim, and anti-women's rights.

According to CNN, Moore has gone on record saying homosexuality should be considered a criminal offense and campaigned on his opposition of transgender rights.

"He's said the United States would have been better off stopping at 10 amendments to the Constitution -- ignoring the reality that those abolishing slavery and establishing the voting rights of women and minorities came later. And he's said Muslims (such as Minnesota Rep. Keith Ellison and Indiana Rep. Andre Carson) should not be allowed to serve in Congress."

Moore's wife Kayla, raised eyebrows during a campaign event for comments she made while denying her husband was a bigot. "Fake news would tell you that we don't care for Jews," she said. "One of our lawyers is a Jew."

During a campaign event in September, Moore said, America's last great era was in the time of slavery and referred to Native Americans and Asian Americans as “reds and yellows."

"He's said the United States would have been better off stopping at 10 amendments to the Constitution -- ignoring the reality that those abolishing slavery and establishing the voting rights of women and minorities came later. And he's said Muslims (such as Minnesota Rep. Keith Ellison and Indiana Rep. Andre Carson) should not be allowed to serve in Congress."
CNN

Reports of voter suppression were shared on social media throughout the day Tuesday along with emotional stories of those who were able to vote for the first time.

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