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Roger Goodell and Jane Skinner Goodell

Roger Goodell's wife used a secret account to defend him on Twitter

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National Football League (NFL) Commissioner Roger Goodell’s wife had a secret Twitter account for defending him from his online critics, according to The Wall Street Journal.

The Journal on Thursday reported that Jane Skinner Goodell admitted to running the @forargument account under the name “Jones smith” since its creation in 2014.

“It was a REALLY silly thing to do and done out of frustration – and love,” she said in a statement.

“As a former media member, I’m always bothered when the coverage doesn’t provide a complete and accurate picture of a story,” the former Fox News anchor added.

A timeline of the NFL anthem protests
It all began when Colin Kaepernick chose to remain seated.
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“I’m also a wife and mom. I have always passionately defended the hard-working guy I love – and I always will. I just may not use Twitter to do so in the future!”

The Journal reported that within an hour of reaching out to Jane Skinner Goodell and the NFL, the account was made private before ultimately shutting down.

The account’s 14 tweets since August are defenses of Roger Goodell aimed at various publications ranging from The Journal to major sports commentators.

One tweet saw the account responding to a tweet from @ProFootballTalk, the popular NBC Sport’s blogs Twitter handle.

The tweet in question said it was “on the commissioner” to solve the NFL’s ongoing national anthem protests.

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“Please do better reporting,” @forargument replied. “He is already doing this. You are behind.”

Scores of NFL coaches, executives and players have knelt during the national anthem since President Trump derided the move last month.

Trump said that NFL employees performing the gesture should be fired, and he has since described it as disrespectful to the U.S. and its flag.

Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick began kneeling during the national anthem in 2016 to protest America’s racial injustice.
Roger Goodell on Tuesday said in a letter to the NFL’s teams that he thinks “everyone should stand for the National Anthem.”

The commissioner added that the NFL has “worked to develop a plan that we will review with you at next week’s League meeting.”

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