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'Pharma bro' Martin Shkreli issued an apology for an alleged threat against Hillary Clinton

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Ex-pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli, aka "Pharma Bro," issued an apology to Hillary Clinton on Tuesday, claiming that his comment to "grab" Clinton's hair was an “awkward attempt at humor or satire” and not a threat.

Last week, Shkreli offered his Facebook followers $5,000 to grab a strand of Hillary Clinton’s hair during her book tour.

Shkreli, 34, insists that it was not a threat.

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Martin Shkreli leaves court in New York, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016. The former pharmaceutical CEO says he'd like to "berate" and "insult" Congress — but instead will take the Fifth Amendment during questioning on Thursday. Meanwhile, his new lawyer, Benjamin Brafman, issued a statement expressing confidence that Shkreli will be exonerated in his federal court case. In December he was charged with securities fraud and conspiracy related to a pharmaceutical company he previously ran, Retrophin. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Former pharmaceutical company CEO Martin Shkreli, second from left, walks out of federal court with his legal team Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017, in New York. Jurors were on their fourth day of deliberations Thursday at the securities fraud trial of the former pharmaceutical company CEO. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
Former Turing Pharmaceuticals CEO Martin Shkreli, left, arrives to federal court with his attorney Benjamin Brafman in New York, Monday, June 26, 2017. Even with his federal securities fraud trial set to begin Monday, Shkreli has blatantly defied his attorneys' advice to lay low. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 17, 2015, file photo, Martin Shkreli
Pharmaceutical chief Martin Shkreli speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016, during the House Committee on Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on his former company's decision to raise the price of a lifesaving medicine. Shkreli refused to testify before U.S. lawmakers who excoriated him over severe hikes for a drug sold by a company that he acquired. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
Martin Shkreli, center, stops with his attorneys to talk to reporters in front of federal court in New York, Friday, Aug. 4, 2017. The former pharmaceutical CEO has been convicted on federal charges he deceived investors in a pair of failed hedge funds. A Brooklyn jury deliberated five days before finding Shkreli guilty on Friday on three of eight counts. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Martin Shkreli, second from left, and his attorney Benjamin Brafman, left, leave federal court in New York, Friday, Aug. 4, 2017. The former pharmaceutical CEO has been convicted on federal charges he deceived investors in a pair of failed hedge funds. A Brooklyn jury deliberated five days before finding Shkreli guilty on Friday on three of eight counts. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

“I used poor judgment.” Shkreli said in a letter to the court, according to ABC News. “But never contended to cause alarm or promote any act of violence whatsoever.”

“It never occurred to me that my awkward attempt at humor or satire would cause Mrs. Clinton or the Secret Service any distress,” he said.

Shkreli is expected to go before a judge on Wednesday to decide on whether to revoke Shkreli’s $5 million bond. This comes after prosecutors in New York claimed that he had become a “danger to the community” and was harassing women online.

The Secret Service interviewed Shkreli shortly after he posted the message. Later on he wrote on Facebook, "Hillary Clinton's presumptive agents are hard at work."

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"Shkreli’s latest threat is concerning not only because it has required a significant expenditure of resources by the United States Secret Service, which is charged with protecting Secretary Clinton, but also because there is a significant risk that one of his many social media followers or others who learn of his offers through the media will take his statements seriously—as has happened previously—and act on them,” they wrote in their motion to revoke bail.

Shkreli currently faces up to 20 years in prison after he was convicted in August of three counts of securities fraud for raising the price of a life-saving AIDS drug Daraprim by 5,000% .

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