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These maids are helping women fighting cancer focus on recovery instead of chores

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Keeping a clean home is already a stressful chore for most healthy people.

Now imagine having to do it while you're battling cancer.

Debbie Sardone is the President and Founder of the nonprofit, Cleaning For A Reason. She says she founded the company in 2006 after she called a prospective client as the owner of "Buckets & Bows Maid Service" who told her she wasn’t able to afford a cleaning service at the time because she was undergoing cancer treatments.


After that, Sardone decided she wanted to help women fighting cancer by providing them with housecleaning services free of charge.

"Cleaning for a Reason" has partnered with maid services across the US and Canada to clean the homes of over 26,000 women, including Future Maids of Round Rock, Texas.

“These women are going through so much and it’s just a struggle sometimes for them and we just want to come in and take some of that load off,” Bonnie Casey, an employee with Future Maids told KEYE TV News.


Lori Brown of Round Rock, Texas was diagnosed with cancer last year. She says keeping up with her daily chores became impossible after starting chemotherapy.

“The chemo literally takes that out of you. Your level of stamina is drastically dropped. Your mind can think that you can do it, but your body is like no, that’s not going to happen,” she said.

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She says with the help of Future Maids and Cleaning for a Reason she was able to focus on her recovery,

“The thought of not being here, the thought of not seeing my family..the thought of not watching my granddaughter grow up..it’s not an option.”

Today, Lori is cancer free.

MORE FROM CIRCA:
A Michigan woman who chose her baby over chemotherapy has died
Hospitals are opening wings exclusively for teens with cancer
Johnson & Johnson was ordered to pay $417M in a lawsuit linking talcum powder to cancer

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