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A White House petition to call Antifa terrorists has over 297K signatures

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A recent Whitehouse.gov petition urging President Trump’s administration to label the so-called “Antifa” a “terrorist organization” has gained nearly 300,000 signatures.

The petition debuted on Aug. 17 and has since grabbed 297,424 signers, nearly three times the 100,000 people needed to receive an “official response” before a Sept. 16 deadline.

“Terrorism is defined as ‘the use of violence and intimidation in pursuit of political aims,’” the petition says.

“This definition is the same definition used to declare ISIS and other groups, as terrorist organizations,” it continues, referencing the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.

“AntiFa has earned this title due to its violent actions in multiple cities and their influence in the killings of multiple police officers throughout the United States.”

Some Twitter users on Friday urged Trump to take action against Antifa, which is a loosely-organized movement of left-leaning anti-fascists.

Former President Barack Obama’s administration launched the Whitehouse.gov petition feature in 2011.

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The platform set a 100,000 signature benchmark within 30 days for prompting an official White House response to a single petition.

Yahoo reported Thursday that Trump’s administration has not yet addressed ten other petitions that crossed the threshold before the Antifa one.

Trump referenced Antifa during his campaign-style rally in Phoenix last Tuesday, mentioning the group as armed and masked.

“You know, they show up in the helmets and the black masks and they’ve got clubs and they’ve got everything,” he said. “Antifa!”

Antifa has gotten fresh national attention following unrest in Charlottesville, Virginia earlier this month involving the movement. White nationalists descended upon Charlottesville to protest the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee there. The situation ultimately turned violent the next day when a car drove into a group of counter-protesters opposing them.

Americans have since fiercely debated the views of far-right and far-left groups in the wake of the tragedy.

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