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Intrepid Anti Assault Adhesive

This bra sticker can detect sexual violence

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A new adhesive device that attaches to bras or underwear can detect when an article of clothing is forcefully removed.

Inventors at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) hope it can help prevent rape and sexual assault.

Conceived by MIT researcher Manisha Mohan, this garment add-on can sense violent removal, and sends a prompt to the wearer asking her to confirm consent.

If the owner doesn't respond within a set time, the tape uses a Bluetooth connection to alert five pre-selected phone contacts to the danger. It also sends a GPS location to them and begins recording audio.

This device, part of the Intrepid project at MIT, tracks how a person normally takes off her clothes, and can differentiate between routine and violent removal of clothing for each individual wearer.

Intrepid operates in two different ways: either actively, when the wearer is unable to resist an assault, or passively, when the wearer is cognizant and able to activate the device.

Assault Detecting Tape

Mohan designed the Intrepid technology especially with campus sexual assault, date rape, child sex abuse, and elderly and disabled abuse in mind - all situations where the victims are incapable of giving consent.

The device can be used by men and women, young and old, but was designed specifically for the most common victims of assault: women between the ages of 18 and 24.

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While the risk of sexual assault is higher for non-college students in this age group, the pervasiveness of campus sexual assault has garnered recent media attention with public figures like former Vice President Joe Biden highlighting the issue and demanding accountability.

RAINN estimates that 23.1 percent of undergraduate females and 5.4 percent of undergraduate males experience rape or sexual violence in college.

However, since most crimes go unreported, it's impossible to accurately measure the problem. RAINN says only 20 percent of female student survivors seek help from authorities, and for women of all age groups, 2 in every 3 assaults go unreported.

Reasons for under-reporting vary, with many female sexual assault survivors saying they didn't come forward because it was too personal, or because they feared repercussions.

Male survivors are even more likely to keep their assaults a secret and to have perceived social stigmas associated with their assault.

Many survivors of both genders also cite a lack of faith in law enforcement to bring their attackers to justice.

This lack of confidence in police response is backed by the numbers: for every 1,000 rapes, 994 perpetrators will walk free. It is the crime most likely to go unpunished.

RAINN 1 IN 6
COURTESY: RAINN

With 1 in 6 women experiencing rape or sexual assault at some point in their lifetime, a lack of accountability across the board is a staggering truth for survivors to face.

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