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There's now a way for you to watch 3-D movies at home without glasses

There's now a way for you to watch 3D movies at home without glasses

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Imagine watching 3D movies in your home and without glasses. New technology from MIT allows you to do just that.

It's called Home3D, and it converts 3D movies into a more TV-friendly format.

"It does it by providing multiple images," said Petr Kellnhofer, the lead author of the research behind Home3D and postdoctoral associate at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL).

"It doesn't require any extra effort from you. You don't have to turn anything on or basically think about it."
Petr Kellnhofer


Most 3D movies you watch in theaters come in that stereoscopic 3-D format, but most people don't have the technology to play those movies at home. Especially now that big TV manufactures like LG and Samsung have ceased supporting 3D content with 3D TVs. Samsung said it did so to focus on smart TVs, but various reports show 3D TVs weren't selling as much as expected across all manufacturers.


"You don't want to be bothered by constantly putting on and off the glasses, thinking about, 'Oh, where did I leave them?'"

Home3D is looking to bring 3D back into people's homes. It runs on real-time GPU, which means it could run on an Xbox or a Playstation. Converting the movie from stereo also means you don't have to use those 3-D glasses people don at the movies.

Petr Kellnhofer (Jason Dorfman, MIT CSAIL)

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But it's not perfect. The layering of images can cause "ghosting," in which an object appears to have a halo around it. The hope is that Home3D can take the form of a chip that you could put into TVs or media players.

"It doesn't require any extra effort from you. You don't have to turn anything on or basically think about it."

Researchers at MIT's CSAIL are hoping to make the chip used for this technology smaller, cheaper and faster.

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