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Marine Le Pen announced she is temporarily stepping down as leader of the National Front

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UPDATE April 24, 2:59 p.m. EST: 

Marine Le Pen announced Monday that she will be temporarily stepping down as the head of the National Front party. 

UPDATE 2:46 p.m. EST: The campaigning has already begun.

Regardless of who wins, the race is already historic thanks to who did not make the cut.

UPDATE 2:16 p.m. EST:

With no presidential candidates claiming a majority, far-right candidate Marine Le Pen will face off against Emmanuel Macron in a runoff election May 7, according to exit polls. 

Macron, a former economic minister in France's socialist government, is a newcomer to the race, running with a political party that is only months old. Le Pen's anti-immigrant platform has resonated with many French voters.

UPDATE  10:07 a.m. EST: President Trump called the election "very interesting."

You just brace yourself, have faith in the NYPD and go about your day.
Sophie Raven, immigration attorney

The New York Daily News reported Saturday that a bomb threat at the French Consulate in New York was a false alarm. However, it prompted an evacuation as votes for expatriates were being collected. Voters continued to show up and vote. 

ORIGINAL STORY: France's presidential election is underway, and the world is watching. With far-right candidate Marine Le Pen drawing many headlines, many expect widespread ramifications if she wins. However, there are 11 candidates on today's ballot, so it's unlikely that any will win an outright majority. A second round of voting is likely next month.

The recent terrorist attack in France may affect voters' decisions. ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack on Thursday.

CORRECTS NAME OF THE MAN - Far-right leader and candidate for the 2017 French presidential election Marine Le Pen casts her vote for the first-round presidential election while National Front Henin-Beaumont's mayor Steeve Briois, right, looks on, in Henin-Beaumont, northern France, Sunday, April 23, 2017.  French voters are casting ballots for their next president in an unusually close first-round election Sunday, after a campaign dominated by concerns about jobs and immigration and clouded by security fears following a recent attack on police guarding the Champs-Elysees in Paris. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
CORRECTS NAME OF THE MAN - Far-right leader and candidate for the 2017 French presidential election Marine Le Pen casts her vote for the first-round presidential election while National Front Henin-Beaumont's mayor Steeve Briois, right, looks on, in Henin-Beaumont, northern France, Sunday, April 23, 2017. French voters are casting ballots for their next president in an unusually close first-round election Sunday, after a campaign dominated by concerns about jobs and immigration and clouded by security fears following a recent attack on police guarding the Champs-Elysees in Paris. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)

Le Pen has run on an anti-immigration platform, promising to put a moratorium even on legal immigration if she wins. She has also vowed to make France exit leave the European Union, CNN reports.

melenchon.jpg
French Left party leader and candidate for the 2017 French presidential election Jean-Luc Melenchon arrives to attend a television debate at French national television France 2, in Saint Cloud, outside Paris, Thursday, April 20, 2017. The 11 men and women hoping to be France's next president are to appear on national television in a last appeal to voters in a nail-biting election campaign. (Martin Bureau/Pool via AP)

On the other end of the political spectrum is the far-left Jean-Luc Mélenchon, dubbed the "French Bernie Sanders." He wants minimum wage increases and tougher taxes on the rich. 

Centrist candidate Emmanuel Macron waves supporters after casting his vote in the first round of the French presidential election, in le Touquet, northern France, Sunday April 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
Centrist candidate Emmanuel Macron waves supporters after casting his vote in the first round of the French presidential election, in le Touquet, northern France, Sunday April 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

Then there's centrist Emmanuel Macron, a relative newcomer to the race. His political party, En Marche!, didn't even exist until September. But early polls suggest he's a strong contender.

French conservative presidential election candidate Francois Fillon leaves the voting booth before voting in the first round of the presidential elections in Paris, Sunday, April 23, 2017. (Christophe Archambault, Pool via AP)
French conservative presidential election candidate Francois Fillon leaves the voting booth before voting in the first round of the presidential elections in Paris, Sunday, April 23, 2017. (Christophe Archambault, Pool via AP)

Francois Fillon is the most traditional conservative candidate, frequently drawing comparisons to iconic British leader Margaret Thatcher. But a scandal involving his family members they didn't actually do derailed his early lead.

Marine Le Pen announced she is temporarily stepping down as leader of the National Front

WATCH | Here's a look at the polling places so far.

The Telegraph reports Le Pen led the race as the polls open, but Macron has surged since. If no candidate wins a majority, the top two will progress to a runoff. Experts predict those two will be Le Pen and Macron.

Many observers predict if Le Pen wins, the European Union may collapse, since the bloc would be devastated by two of its biggest members leaving now that Brexit is underway. Early polls showed one in three French voters were still undecided just days before the vote. 

polling soldiers.jpg
Army soldiers patrol past posters showing faces of the candidates for the first-round presidential election near a polling station in Paris, Sunday, April 23, 2017. French voters are casting ballots for their next president in an unusually close first-round election Sunday, after a campaign dominated by concerns about jobs and immigration and clouded by security fears following a recent attack on police guarding the Champs-Elysees in Paris. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

After a hostile campaign and the recent attacks, security measures have been ramped up at polling places. About 50,000 police officers and 7,000 soldiers have been deployed nationwide, The Telegraph reports.

President Trump warned the terrorist attack would  have a "big effect" on the race.

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