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House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., listens on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, March 20, 2017, during the committee's hearing on allegations of Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Nunes rejected calls for his recusal and said his investigation is proceeding as scheduled

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UPDATE 4:13 p.m. EST:

A Republican calls for recusal.

UPDATE 4:07 p.m. EST:

Nunes invited Comey to testify.

UPDATE 11:02 a.m. EST:

House Speaker Paul Ryan, when asked Tuesday by reporters if Nunes should recuse himself and if he knows who Nunes' sources, responded, "No and no."

UPDATE 10:11 a.m. EST:

Rep. Nunes reiterated that he would not recuse himself from the House investigation into alleged Russian ties to the Trump campaign.

When asked by reporters if the investigation could "move forward" with him as chair, Nunes responded, "Why would it not?" He insisted the investigation was continuing as scheduled.

UPDATE March 28, 8:21 a.m. EST:

The House Intelligence Committee has canceled all meetings for this week, CNN reports.

The committee has been divided over tensions inflamed by Chairman Devin Nunes (R-CA)'s decision to cancel a public hearing set for Tuesday. Nunes' decision to brief the press and the White House on documents he received alleging surveillance that included then-candidate Trump has led to calls for his recusal from both Republicans and Democrats. Nunes said Monday he would not step aside.

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) joined the previously mostly Democratic criticism Tuesday morning, saying Nunes' objectivity in the investigation into ties between the Trump campaign and Russia was "in question."

Graham said the fact that Nunes secretly went to the White House to receive the documents and meet his source was "a little bizarre." The White House claims it has no information about the encounter between Nunes and his source, despite procedures that require clearing a visit to the White House complex in advance, The Washington Post reports.

Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) said Nunes had "a lot of explaining to do."

Meanwhile, Trump has attempted to draw attention to Hillary Clinton's Russian ties.

John Podesta.jpg
John Podesta, campaign chairman, announces that Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton will not be making an appearance at Jacob Javits Center in New York, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016 as the votes are still being counted. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

The source of Trump's tweets appears to be outlets such as Zero Hedge and The Daily Caller, which have claimed John Podesta, Clinton's campaign chairman, had financial ties to Russian companies.

Nunes rejected calls for his recusal and said his investigation is proceeding as scheduled

WATCH  | Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) said House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes (R-CA) is "falling down on the job."

UPDATE 4:20 p.m. EST: 

"Chairman Nunes is falling down on the job and seems to be more interested in protecting the president than in seeking the truth," Schumer said from the Senate floor Monday. "You cannot have the person in charge of an investigation be partial to one side. It's an inherent contradiction." 

Schumer added that having someone who shows any type of bias handling an investigation of this nature "undermines decades of bipartisan cooperation on the intelligence committee."

Nunes rejected calls for his recusal and said his investigation is proceeding as scheduled

WATCH  | Schumer said it looks like Nunes is protecting Trump.

UPDATE 3:47 p.m. EST:

Schumer eyes a "credible" probe.

UPDATE 3:39 p.m. EST:

Schumer seeks Nunes' removal.

UPDATE 2:08 p.m. EST:

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said President Trump was "not concerned" with Nunes' actions. 

He also said that Nunes had previously stated on the record that he had not met with White House staff before briefing Trump.

ORIGINAL STORY: A spokesman for Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA), chair of the House Intelligence Committee, confirmed Monday that Nunes met with the source of surveillance documents pertaining to President Trump at the White House, USA Today reports.

Nunes said last week he had been given information that showed how the  U.S. intelligence community collected Trump's communications incidentally. He told reporters and briefed the White House before he spoke to the committee, which drew ire from Democrats and some Republicans.

Nunes spokesman Jack Langer said Monday Nunes met his source at the White House to ensure security for the source. He refused to identify the source.

"The chairman is extremely concerned by the possible improper unmasking of names of U.S. citizens, and he began looking into this issue even before President Trump tweeted his assertion that Trump Tower had been wiretapped," Langer said.

Critics thought the location was a sign that the leaks came from the White House.

Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA) said the news was "more than suspicious."

I don't know why he would brief the president on something that he gave him. It doesn't seem to make ton of sense.
Sean Spicer, last week

Nunes' initial report came just days after FBI Director James Comey said there was no evidence of Trump's claims that former President Obama wiretapped him. 

Last week, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer denied claims that Trump himself leaked the information.

FILE - In this March 22, 2017, file photo, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Nunes privately apologized to his Democratic colleagues on Thursday, March 23, 2017, yet publicly defended his decision to openly discuss and brief President Donald Trump on typically secret intercepts that he says swept up communications of the president's transition team in the final days of the Obama administration. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE - In this March 22, 2017, file photo, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Nunes privately apologized to his Democratic colleagues on Thursday, March 23, 2017, yet publicly defended his decision to openly discuss and brief President Donald Trump on typically secret intercepts that he says swept up communications of the president's transition team in the final days of the Obama administration. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

NBC News reports Nunes didn't need to go to the White House for security purposes. His own committee has a secure room for viewing secret documents. 

But Trump supporters were more focused on what they saw as criminal activity by Obama.

And some defended his decision not to speak to ranking Democrat Adam Schiff (D-CA).

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