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Should you be paranoid that your iPhone could be spying on you?

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Should you be paranoid that your iPhone could be spying on you?

WATCH | WikiLeaks says it has a blueprint to get into any iPhone it wants, but Apple says it's not true. Who should you believe?

Apple issued a strong statement on Friday after WikiLeaks released a handful of documents that point to an apparent CIA program to hack Apple's iPhones and Mac computers, saying it was all old material that the Cupertino giant had addressed. 

After a preliminary assessment of the Dark Matter release from Thursday morning, Apple said the alleged iPhone vulnerability affected iPhone 3G only and was fixed in 2009 when iPhone 3GS was released in 2008.

Our preliminary assessment shows the alleged Mac vulnerabilities were previously fixed in all Macs launched after 2013.
Apple spokesperson

Apple said it has not worked or negotiated with WikiLeaks after it reportedly demanded companies patch within 90 days:

"We have not negotiated with WikiLeaks for any information. We have given them instructions to submit any information they wish through our normal process under our standard terms," the spokesperson added.

Meanwhile, iPhone users in the middle of the "they said-they said" are left wondering whom to believe.


"I actually don’t believe anybody in the world has a way to crack an iPhone 5s or later," tech author and consultant Shelly Palmer told Circa. "[Those models have] a piece of hardware called Secure Enclave ... that makes the phone pretty much uncrackable."

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The new Apple iPhone 5 is displayed Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 following the introduction of new products in San Francisco. The iPhone 5 is a blend of beauty, utility and versatility. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

Palmer said iPhone models earlier than the 5s (like the iPhone 5 pictured here) are in fact "vulnerable," though the tech expert hedged by saying that getting into even older iPhones requires "serious skills."

WikiLeaks called Apple's claim that issues had been fixed "duplicitous."

But Apple also issued the toughest statement yet from a tech firm on WikiLeaks' demands about how they address the vulnerabilities it claims to have exposed, saying it hadn't negotiated with Julian Assange's organization.

"The most notable part of this latest WikiLeaks release is that it shows the CIA doing exactly what we pay them to  -- exploit specific targets with limited attacks to support our national interests," said Rich Mogull, CEO of the security research firm Securosis.

--The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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