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A second judge has suspended Trump's new travel ban, this time in Maryland

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UPDATE March 16, 6:11 a.m. EST:

A federal judge in Maryland also suspended President Trump's revised travel ban early Thursday, hours after a judge in Hawaii did the same thing. 

U.S. District Judge Theodore Chuang argued Trump's comments with Rudy Giuliani, in which he said he originally wanted a "Muslim ban," showed the law constituted religious discrimination.

Here's part of the ruling. 

UPDATE at 9:56 pm: Hours after a federal judge in Hawaii brought a temporary halt against President Trump's revised executive order on immigration, the Department of Justice said it "strongly disagrees" with the ruling, calling it "flawed both in reasoning and scope."

The Department is expected to continue defending the legislation as it trickles through the judicial system.

UPDATE at 8:29 pm:

During a rally in Tennessee, President Trump publicly reacted to the federal judge's ruling in Hawaii that brought a temporary halt to what he described as a "watered-down version of the first order." He called the ruling by U.S. District Court Judge Derrick Watson as "flawed" and "an unprecedented judicial overreach."

"I have to be nice otherwise i'll be criticized for speaking poorly about our courts," Trump spoke to a roaring crowd.

In the aftermath of his first executive order,  Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch described the president's tweets about the "so-called" federal judge in Seattle as "demoralizing" and "disheartening."

Original story

A federal judge in Hawaii has granted a temporary restraining order on President Trump's revised executive order on immigration on Wednesday, just one day before it was to be fully implemented at midnight on Thursday, Politico reported.

The news broke just moments before President Trump took the stage at a rally in Nashville, Tennessee. 

A federal judge brings a temporary halt to Trump's revised travel ban
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U.S. District Court Judge Derrick Watson cited a provision of the First Amendment in his 43-page opinion, saying Trump's revised executive order violated the "Establishment Clause," which prohibits the government from "establishing a religion." Though the "establishment" definition is vague, it has been historically interpreted as to prohibit state-sponsored churches, such as the Church of England.

“A reasonable, objective observe enlightened by the specific historical context, contemporaneous public statements, and specific sequence of events leading to its issuance would conclude that the Executive Order was issued with a purpose to disfavor a particular religion," the opinion read.

Watson heard arguments in a suit by the State of Hawaii and the imam of the Muslim Association of Hawaii, Ismail Elshikh. The state of Hawaii became the first state to challenge Trump's revised travel ban, which eliminated Iraq from the list of banned countries, and allowed those who already possessed visas to be permitted to enter the country.

WATCH | Trump's executive orders on immigration experience major pushback. 

Two other states, including Maryland and Seattle, filed similar court documents opposing Trump's new directive. 

Earlier in the day, U.S. District Court Judge Theodore Chuang of Maryland grilled lawyers who attacked the ban, but ultimately never gave any indication of whether he would block some or all of the legislation before it would take hold on Thursday.  

U.S. District Judge James Robart, the federal judge in Seattle who brought a temporary halt to Trump's original travel ban, adjourned Wednesday afternoon without giving a specific timeline for a ruling.

A second judge has suspended Trump's new travel ban, this time in Maryland

WATCH | For more news you need, check out Circa 60.

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