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The empty seat of former UKIP leader Nigel Farage is pictured at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, early Tuesday, March 14, 2017. Britain lurched closer to leaving the European Union Monday when Parliament stopped resisting and gave Prime Minister Theresa May the power to file for divorce from the bloc. (AP Photo/Jean-Francois Badias)

The Queen signed off on Parliament's Brexit bill. Here's what comes next.

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UPDATE  March 16, 8:35 a.m.:

The Queen signed off on the British Parliament's Brexit bill on Thursday. 

Prime Minister Theresa May can now decide when to invoke Article 50 and begin the process of leaving the European Union, the BBC reports.

Brexit Secretary David Davis said she would do so "by the end of the month."

ORIGINAL STORY: The British Parliament approved its Brexit bill Monday night, and it is expected to be signed by the Queen early Tuesday.

After denying Prime Minister Theresa May the right to begin Brexit without parliamentary approval in a court battle, the bill passed after bouncing back and forth between the House of Commons and the House of Lords. The latter house attempted to add amendments, including a provision allowing European Union citizens living in the U.K. to stay there, but was outvoted. 

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British Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street in London, to attend Prime Minister's Questions at the Houses of Parliament, Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017. Britain's House of Commons is to vote on a bill Wednesday authorizing Prime Minister Theresa May to start European Union exit talks — the first major test of whether lawmakers will try to impede the government's Brexit plans. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

So now what? 

Once the Queen signs off on the bill, which is expected to be a formality, May can invoke Article 50 and start the process of leaving the EU.But there's some politics involved...

May could, theoretically, invoke Article 50 on Tuesday.  She self-imposed a deadline of March 31. She may wait out that whole period, as the Netherlands will hold its election on Wednesday. One candidate, Geert Wilders, has promised to hold a referendum on the Netherlands leaving the EU, similar to Brexit. May is likely to wait to see what happens with the Dutch before making a decision.

Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon sits in the main chamber of the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh, Scotland Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017 ahead of the vote on the Scottish Government's plans to keep Scotland in the European single market even if the rest of the Britain leaves. (Jane Barlow/PA via AP)
Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon sits in the main chamber of the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh, Scotland Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017 ahead of the vote on the Scottish Government's plans to keep Scotland in the European single market even if the rest of the Britain leaves. (Jane Barlow/PA via AP)

Additionally, Scotland has asked for a second independence vote. Scotland voted heavily to stay in the EU during the Brexit vote. May hasn't said whether or not she'd allow the vote.

We are now on the threshold of the most important negotiation for our country in a generation.
David Davis, Brexit secretary

Scotland's First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, said she wanted a vote between fall 2018 and spring of 2019. But May, even if she allows the vote, may trigger Brexit before then, the BBC reports.

The leader of the liberal Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn, tweeted his disappointment.

But he still vowed to fight for what he thought was the best possible Brexit.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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