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A sign showing the 'Doomsday Clock' that remains at three minutes to midnight is seen after it was unveiled by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016, during a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington. The clock was last moved January 2015, from five minutes to three minutes before midnight, the closest it has been to catastrophe since the days of hydrogen bomb testing. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

The Doomsday Clock moved 30 seconds forward. It's now 2.5 minutes to midnight

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The Doomsday Clock moved 30 seconds forward. It's now 2.5 minutes to midnight

WATCH | How close are we to destroying humanity? Pretty close, according to the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. 

UPDATE  10:06 a.m.:

The Doomsday Clock was moved 30 seconds forward Thursday, making it two-and-a-half minutes to midnight.

Scientists cited increased nuclear tensions between India and Pakistan in addition to North Korea's missile test. 

The Bulletin has never moved the Doomsday Clock by any fraction of a minute before. 

The Bulletin also condemned President Trump's refusal to clearly acknowledge the impact of man-caused climate change. 

"The Trump administration needs to state clearly and unequivocally that it accepts climate change," the board said. 


ORIGINAL STORY:

The Doomsday Clock, a global indication of how close experts believe the apocalypse is, will be updated Thursday morning.


The clock has been at "three minutes to midnight" since 2015, but global geopolitical tensions may inch the clock closer to midnight, which represents doomsday. 

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists and a board that includes 15 Nobel Prize winners maintains the clock. The 2017 update will be live-streamed at 10 a.m. Eastern time.

Doomsday Clock.jpg
Lawrence Krauss, left, the chair of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, and former ambassador Thomas R. Pickering, far right, stand after unveiling the 'Doomsday Clock' that remains at three minutes to midnight, during a news conference, Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016 in Washington. The clock was last moved January 2015, from five minutes to three minutes before midnight, the closest it has been to catastrophe since the days of hydrogen bomb testing. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

The closest the clock has been to midnight was two minutes away in 1953 after the first hydrogen bomb tests. The Bulletin was created in 1945 after the Manhattan Project as scientists grew concerned over atomic bombs' impact.

What could tip the clock?

President Trump's rhetoric on nuclear weapons and belief that climate change is a hoax could push the clock closer to midnight. Additionally, growing distrust in major institutions, including scientists, global cybersecurity threats, and tensions between the U.S. and Russia could push the clock forward, according to a Bulletin statement.

The Independent reports scientists are likely to move the clock closer to midnight. 

While the clock originally focused on nuclear weapons, it has expanded to include climate change and artificial intelligence as possible world-ending threats. 

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