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Dr. Fernando De Trazegnies, Peru's Minister of Foreign Affairs, takes a moment to record the beauty of the Ross Ice Shelf Tuesday Jan. 26, 1999. Determined to preserve Antarctica's unique environment, world officials convened for the first time Monday on the frozen continent to discuss strategies for its future. The territory faces a slew of problems in upcoming years that include environmental hazards, fishing disputes and a recent tourist boom that threatens its status as one of the most unspoilt places on earth. (AP Photo/Alexander Colhoun)

Blistery conditions in Antarctica aren't stopping this California native from marching

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As marchers across the continental U.S. continue to gather in massive numbers, a smaller, but brave, group of protesters assembled in Antarctica thanks to the efforts of Linda Zunas, who, in her day job, conducts advanced analytics for a wine company in Oakland, California. 

Zunas told Circa that she organized the march to bring attention to climate issues. 

"I spent a month after the election mourning the impending damage to the earth that will be done," she said.

Despite tight constraints and limited resources, nearly 100 people from six countries, including the U.S., Argentina, New Zealand, Czech Republic, Canada, England, among others, assembled on a ship to participate in a global movement.

They're mainly focused on environmental issues, such as protecting wildlife and preserving the environment, but some of the marchers, Zunas said, are more interested in highlighting issues of equality. 

A small group of participants gathered on Wednesday to make signs. 

Ranging in age from 24 to 87, the protestors marched on the continent in Paradise Bay. 

Zunas emphasized that the march wasn't intended to be political. 

Zunas has traveled to all seven continents, but described Antarctica her "favorite place on the planet," due to the incredible views, vibrant colors and unique wildlife. 

Penguins want peace, too.

Zunas has made the trek to Antarctica three times, but observed noticeable differences this time around. 

"It sadly has been quite warm here--much warmer than when I was here in 2008 and 2011."

The water temperature, she added, is about two degrees Celsius (35 degrees Fahrenheit) while the air temperature has ranged from two to five degrees Celsius. 

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