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Remembering when the 'Helicopter Girls' pulled off a big stunt to meet The Beatles in LA

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Remembering when the 'Helicopter Girls' pulled off a big stunt to meet The Beatles in LA

WATCH  | Kay Zar Crow was only 15 years old when she pulled off a helicopter stunt to meet The Beatles.  She shared her story of becoming a "Helicopter Girl" with Circa correspondent Stephanie Abrams, and says the new documentary "Eight Days a Week" takes her right back to 1965 and Beatlemania.

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Kay Zar Crow shares her memories and pictures with Circa's Stephanie Abrams

Kay showed us all the articles written about her group of fan friends in 1965 after they managed to get a face-to-face with The Beatles. They were featured all over local television, in the Los Angeles Times and even Life magazine.

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Kay Crow and "The Helicopter Girls" reunite

Kay shared this picture from her reunion with the "Helicopter Girls" just last year when they re-created that original Times photo. The media turned out to watch the teens try to get The Beatles' attention by flying over the home where they stayed.

I don't think millennials know what a big deal it is, but the music of today wouldn't be where it is if it weren't for The Beatles.
Kay Zar Crow, Beatles Fan

"Beatlemania changed the way rock 'n' roll was being done," said Kay Crow. "We had to meet them, and we wanted to dress like their girlfriends."  

Fifty-one years later, she says Beatlemania is still a big deal -- because their music changed the world.

WATCH  | Kay says the Ron Howard film "Eight Days a Week: The Touring Years" is a must-watch for millennials to understand what Beatlemania felt like. It follows The Beatles from 1962 to 1966. The film is available to stream and is also playing in these theaters.  

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Aug. 29, 1965: Photographers at press conference for the Beatles before their performance at the Hollywood Bowl. Seated on right is Paul McCartney with Ringo Starr partly visible behind him. Standing on right is John Lennon. This photo was published in the Aug. 31, 1965 Los Angeles Times.-Cal Montney Copyright 1965 Los Angeles Times Reprinted with Permission

After the girls gained media attention, they were invited to the "Help" press conference at Capitol Records where they finally got a chance to meet their idols. Look closely -- you'll spot them at the far right. 

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The Beatles are not merely awful, I would consider it sacrilegious to say anything less than that they are godawful.
William F. Buckley, 1964

It's clear in 2016 that The Beatles were a huge success, and the members all acclaimed artists.

But it wasn't always that way.  Take a look back with The Wall Street Journal as the newspaper quotes the critics of the '60s. 

The pictures from the LA Times of the Helicopter Girls and from the press conference are by R.L. Oliver and Cal Montney Copyright 1965 Los Angeles Times and reprinted with permission.

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