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Samsung Galaxy Note7 (left) and Apple's iPhone 6 Plus (right) (Photos by AP)

The Supreme Court hears arguments in Samsung v. Apple today. Here's what you need to know.

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U.S. Supreme Court justices will hear arguments Tuesday in the Samsung Electronics Co. v. Apple  lawsuit.

The copyright law case originally started in 2011, and it's gotten pretty complicated since then. Here's what you need to know.

So what's all this about?

The key question is, did the Galaxy S phones violate Apple's copyrights on the original iPhone.

The short answer is yes, legal experts told Fortune. The long answer is, probably.

But does that mean Samsung is going to have to pay? And if so, how much? Previous court rulings have gone in Apple's favor.

Specifically, Apple has pointed to the Galaxy's rounded corners and 4x4 grid of app icons as violating patents.

FILE - In this July 28, 2016, file photo, a color blending feature of the Galaxy Note 7 is demonstrated in New York. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
FILE - In this July 28, 2016, file photo, a color blending feature of the Galaxy Note 7 is demonstrated in New York. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

You can patent rounded corners?

Yep. It's a design element, and design patents can last up to 14 years (or 15 if filed after May 13, 2015). 

So what's Samsung's defense?

Samsung is arguing that the rounded corners and other copyrights don't constitute a total ripoff, since smartphones are so complex.

An appeals court ruled Samsung has to hand over all profits from products that ripped off the iPhone design. But Samsung says since those elements weren't the primary reason for its devices' successes, it shouldn't have to pay full price, which would be about $400 million.

iPhone 2016.jpg
FILE - In this Sept. 19, 2014, file photo, a customer looks at the screen size on an iPhone 6 Plus while waiting in line to upgrade his iPhone at a Verizon Wireless store in Flowood, Miss. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)

What's Apple's counter-argument?

SCOTUSblog reports that the wording of patent laws is pretty specific: Violators are liable for "the extent of total profit." To Apple, that means Samsung owes $400 million.

So when will we know who wins?

Probably not until December at least, according to Fortune.

Whose side are you on - Apple or Samsung?

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