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ISIS keeps a store-like price list for sex slaves, selling them as young as age 1

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ISIS keeps a store-like price list for sex slaves, selling them as young as age 1

WATCH:  A price list for Christian and Yazidi captured by ISIS

'The Spoils of War'

The Islamic State maintains a detailed price sheet for selling Christian and Yazidi girls as young as 1 year old as sex slaves in a document entitled "The Spoils of War" that suggests the terror group may be financing its activities by trafficking women to Turkish, Syrians, and Gulf Arabs, according to evidence submitted to the State Department.

Systemic genocide

Human rights activists say Western powers haven't done enough to stop the sexual enslavement and to investigate whether trafficking goes beyond ISIS soldiers to other countries, or to stop a systematic genocide targeting Christians in Syria and Yazidi minorities in Iraq.

Congress and the State Department earlier this year declared the slaughter a genocide for the first time.

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Walther is an expert on genocide and sexual slavery who has visited the region.

'Could completely disappear'

"The fact that certain groups, Christians, Yazidis and others could completely disappear is something that is not being addressed at a level sufficient enough to keep these groups not flourishing, but surviving," Andrew T. Walther, a vice president of the Catholic Knights of Columbus, told Circa. 

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The ISIS document was verified by United Nations officials, but has not gotten the attention anti-sex trafficking activists believe it deserves. (Photo courtesy Catholic Knights of Columbus)

Price adjustments

Walther's group, the world's largest Catholic fraternal organization, submitted a 400-page investigative report earlier this year to the State Department, accumulating evidence that it and the nonprofit In Defense of Christians gathered while aiding victims.

The report included a document written by Islamic State, or ISIS, that shows the terrorist organization suffered a decrease in sales of sex slaves and was adjusting the prices to regulate the sale of Christian women as far back as 2014.

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Islamic State group militants took this photo of Yazidi girl Nazdar Murat, as part of a database the militants have put together of Yazidi girls and women they have enslaved, shown in this May 18, 2016, photo taken during an interview with her family at Kankhe Camp for the internally displaced in Dahuk, northern Iraq. The Associated Press obtained a batch of 48 headshots of enslaved girls, smuggled out by one who escaped. “They register every slave, every person under their owner, and therefore if she escapes, every Daesh control or checkpoint ... they know that this girl ... has escaped from this owner,” said Mirza Danai, founder of the aid organization Luftbrucke Irak, using the Arabic term for IS. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

Islamic State group militants took this photo of Yazidi girl Nazdar Murat, as part of a database the militants have put together of Yazidi girls and women they have enslaved. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

Cartel price-fixing scheme

The ISIS document reads like a corporate cartel price-fixing scheme. It states the group has "received news that the demand in women and spoils of war market has been experiencing a significant decrease, which adversely affects the Islamic State of Iraq revenue and the financing of the Mujahideen assaults."

Therefore, the committee of the Treasury considered setting regulations and prices with regards to selling women and spoils of war," it adds. 


Closer to extinction

On a trip last year to Iraq's Kurdistan region, Archbishop Bashar Warda, head of the Chaldean Catholic Church in Erbil, said the massacre of the Yazidis, pillaging of Christian communities and abduction of minority women and children has destroyed the ancient communities and pushed them closer to extinction.

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A translation of the ISIS sex slave price list that converts prices from Iraqi dinars to U.S. dollars.

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Lamiya Aji Bashar, an 18-year-old Yazidi girl who escaped her Islamic State group enslavers, talks to The Associated Press in northern Iraq in this May 5, 2016 photo. She described how she was abducted along with her sisters and brothers when IS overran her village in 2014 and was passed around from militant to militant, trying to escape many times. Finally she succeeded in March, but only after a mine exploded, killing two girls fleeing with her and leaving Bashar's face scarred and blinding her in one eye. (AP Photo/Balint Szlanko)

This Yazidi girl was captured by ISIS and made a sex slave. When she tried to escape, she was wounded by a land mine before securing her freedom and being nursed back to health. (AP Photo)


Targeted for extermination

"Yazidis were really caught in the middle of the slaughtering campaign, a genocide," said Bishop Warda, whose church aids tens of thousands of Yazidi refugees.

"The Yazidis, poor, poor Yazidis, were really caught in a shock where they were kidnapped, sold on the market, subjected to various kinds of violence and death and most of the world did nothing to stop it," Warda said.


What do you think?
Walther added: "The fact of the matter is that our government and governments all over the world including in Iraq and Kurdistan have specified that what's happening to Christian, Yazidis, and others is genocide, they have been targeted for extermination. It's on ISIS' magazine cover this month."

Follow Sara A. Carter on Twitter: @SaraCarterDC

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