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US hits target of taking in 10,000 Syrian refugees

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The number of Syrian refugees brought to the United States soared past 10,000  earlier this week. This means that the target President Obama set for the 2016 fiscal year has been met.

 At the beginning of August, 8000 had already arrived in the U.S., so 2000 have arrived just in the past few weeks.

 

San Diego has received more refugees than any other city in the country, with 625 coming in in the past year. 


Other cities with large numbers include:

  • Chicago (469) 
  • Glendale, Arizona (384)
  • Troy, Michigan (325)
  • Dallas (293) 

California and Michigan are almost tied among states which have received the most refugees. 

The approximately 8,000 Syrian refugees that came in through Aug. 5 have resettled in 38 states where nonprofit groups, faith-based communities and volunteers exist in large numbers to help in the transition process. Records show that the vast majority of the refugees are Sunni Muslims.

On the topic of national security, Secretary of State John Kerry told reporters that the U.S. has "sufficient methods" of screening would-be refugees.

 "We are very comfortable that we are bringing people in who will be a great plus to our country." Kerry said.

Republicans however are not sold that Syrian refugees can be properly screened.

During an event in early August in Erie, Pennsylvania, GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump said he would like to help those fleeing war and ISIS, but the U.S. needs to be more restrictive in its refugee program until it solves open borders. "We can't take a chance," Trump said.

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The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

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