ADVERTISEMENT
About Our People Legal Stuff
Turtles.mpg.00_01_12_13.Still002.jpg

Turtles are helping researchers save the Great Lakes

0
Turtles are helping researchers save the Great Lakes

Researchers at the Notre Dame ecology lab are using turtles to study pollution in the Great Lakes. When analyzed, researchers found that the tissue of painted and snapping turtles contain the same concentration of contaminants as found in the soil of the wetlands -- making them an ideal "pollution barometer." 

They tell us a lot more of the environment than just taking water and sediment samples.
Gary Lamberti, Professor of Biology at Notre Dame

Researchers take samples from animals like fish and turtles that live in the lakes instead of water and soil from the lakes because it tells them the broader scope of the effects of pollution. 

Turtles are high on the food chain and live relatively long, making them ideal for the project.

Turtles can't metabolize the contaminants, like iron and lead, and instead store them in the rest of their body, like in muscle tissue and the shell. 

Turtles.00_05_16_16.Still001.jpg
Researchers at Notre Dame are using turtles to save the Great Lakes

Luckily, the researchers discovered the turtles store the same levels in their shells and claws as they do in their muscles and liver meaning they don't have to kill the turtles to do the testing. 

turtlesGIF.gif
Researchers at Notre Dame are using turtles to save the Great Lakes

So these heroes on the half shell can continue living in the lakes while helping save them. 

Venus flytrap poacher catches prison time for stealing 970 plants

For more news you need, check out our 60 Second Circa.

Comments
Read Comments
Comments
ADVERTISEMENT
Facebook Twitter Instagram Pinterest Linked In List Menu Enlarge Gallery Info Menu Close Angle Down Angle Up Angle Left Angle Right Grid Grid Play Align Left Search Youtube Mail Mail Angle Down Bookmark